The Cedar Bog trip was fantastic. Time really does fly when you are having fun. The trip went by really fast while we were learning about the plants. The Ohio  History Connection people were very nice and friendly at Cedar Bog. We were all very active in photographing the beauty of all the plants present at the place. It was a hot day but it also rained which got us wet, but it was worth it because we got to learn so much on the trip.
Cedar Bog (that is not a bog), is the first nature preserve of Ohio that was bought by state money. It is a national natural landmark. It is very rich in floristic diversity. It has several plants and animal species. It has more than forty rare plants and animals that are in the endangered category. The total protected area is 450 acres. Cedar Bog (that is not a bog) is a fen actually. The definition of a fen is a wetland area, that drains water. However a Bog retains water . The Cedar bog is a fen that was left behind by retreating glaciers from about 12,000-18,000 years ago. (https://www.cedarbognp.org/). The water temperature at Cedar Bog (that is actually a fen) is usually about 45 degrees Fahrenheit in all seasons.
Scavenger Hunt Assignment: Name two graminoids that you found during the trip.

 

Cotton Sedges

In botany, a graminoid is defined as a herbaceous plant with morphology like grass. Graminoids are grasses, sedges, and rushes.  This is a graminoid that is called a Cotton sedge. We know that this is a sedge because it has triangular edges. Sedges have edges and that is one of the things that tells us that it is a sedge because it has edges. Cotton Grass needs a colder climate to thrive in and prefers to live in open wetlands (https://cottongrass.weebly.com/all-about-cotton-grass.html).

Carex Flava

In botany, a graminoid is defined as a herbaceous plant with morphology like grass. Graminoids are grasses, sedges, and rushes. This is a graminoid that is called a Carex Flava. This is more commonly known as a yellow sedge. We know that this is a sedge because it has triangular edges. Sedges have edges and that is one of the things that tells us that it is a sedge because it has edges. This is native to Northern United States. The name “Yellow Sedge” comes from the perigynia. The perigynia is the covering of the seeds. The covering has a yellow body and that’s where the sedge gets its name of “Yellow Sedge” (https://gobotany.nativeplanttrust.org/species/carex/flava/).

 

Four species that live in a Fen

American basswood

The Coefficient of Conservatism is 7. We can tell that this is basswood because the leaves are heart-shaped and are alternately arranged. Also, they have unequal bases and are about 3 inches in length. The light brown to the gray color of its twigs also give it away that it is a Basswood. Basswood trees live for about 150 years and I found that fact of their life span very interesting (https://homeguides.sfgate.com/basswood-trees-76551.html).

Swamp buttercup

The coefficient of Conservatism is  5. The flower has 5 yellow petals. It has 5 sepals. It has many yellow stamens. It has the shape of a buttercup flower and the overall shape makes it very evident that it is a buttercup. It grows in very moist areas like that of the swamp. I found this buttercup in a swamp area so that is another way to confirm that it is a buttercup. An interesting fact about buttercups is that 12 grams of buttercup can kill you. It is poisonous to cows as well (https://everythingwhat.com/how-many-types-of-buttercups-are-there).

Blue Flag

The coefficient of Conservatism is  5. It has flat leaves, and the color of its flower makes it very evident that it is a Blue Flag. The rhizome of the Blue Flag is poisonous. However, it was used by colonists. They were able to use it safely with the help of the native people. The major purpose was healing (https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=irve2).

Black Ash

The Coefficient of Conservatism is 7. Black ash can be recognized by examining a tree’s leaf buds. Black ash has black terminal buds and that is a big give away and that is how we know it is black ash. The black ash tree is a slow-growing tree and that is one reason that it is commercially unimportant. These trees live for about 150 years and I found this very interesting (http://www.museum.state.il.us/muslink/forest/htmls/trees/F-nigra.html#:~:text=Interesting%20Facts,%2C%20chair%20seats%2C%20or%20barrels.) (https://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/franig/all.html).